Faculty Spotlight

Professor Blair Schoene

Associate Professor of Geosciences

Area(s): Crustal Evolution, Earth History, and Geochronologyand Thermochronology

Teaching

GEO372 - Rocks
GEO373 - Structural Geology
GEO464 - Quantifying Geologic Time
GEO 556 - Construction and Evolution of Continents

Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) laboratory

The Princeton radiogenic isotope geoscience lab was completed in 2011.  The laboratory mainstains a IsotopX PhoeniX62 Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) to perform high-precision U-Pb geochronology on zircons and other accessory minerals with sub-picogram Pb blanks. MORE ABOUT THE LAB

 

Blair Schoene, Associate Professor of Geosciences

Research Summary

I am a geologist who uses a variety of tools to understand Earth history with a focus on how magmatic processes build continental crust and and affect the biosphere, atmosphere, and oceans.   I run a high-precision U-Pb geochronology lab, and understanding timescales features prominently in much of my group’s research.  Most  projects begin in the field with outrcrop to regional scale mapping, using complementary approaches such as thermochronology, radiogenic isotope tracing, structural analysis, geochemistry, and numerical and statistical techniques.  My lab is in Geosciences at Princeton, and consists of low-blank clean room facilities, two thermal ionization mass spectrometers, rock and mineral separation and characterization facilities. My group also shares space and instrumentation with other lab groups in the department that measure stable and radiogenic isotopes and geochemistry of a whole variety of Earth materials.

 


In the News


 

More recent articles

Thursday, Apr 25, 2019
When the landmass that is now the Indian subcontinent slammed into Asia about 50 million years ago, the collision changed the configuration of the continents, the landscape, global climate and more. Now a team of Princeton University scientists has identified one more effect: the oxygen in the world’s oceans increased, altering the conditions for...
Tuesday, Apr 23, 2019

GEO graduate students Abigale Wyatt and Allison Hogikyan have each received a fellowship award in the 2019 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

Tuesday, Apr 9, 2019
Deep in the heart of alien worlds, crystals form under pressures up to 40 million times more intense than the atmospheric pressure on Earth, and as much as 10 times more intense than the pressure in our planet's core. Understanding them better could help us search for life elsewhere in our galaxy.
Wednesday, Mar 13, 2019
The Simon Foundation has granted Assistant Professor of Geosciences and at the Princeton Environmental Institute Prof. Xinning Zhang a Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Award for the period of 2019-2022.
Tuesday, Mar 12, 2019
A new paper from a team of researchers claimed that it is possible to dim the sky in such a way that no region of the planet will be made significantly worse. The scenario may sound like science fiction, but the debate over the prudence of this technique—called solar geo-engineering—has already begun.

Pages