News - 2012 - 2012

faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

Related News:

In The News

  


 

More recent articles

Thursday, Dec 6, 2012
The specimen happens to be an extremely fine hematite (iron oxide, Fe2O3) sample from the famous mines on the Island of Elba, Italy. The locality is known for its unique, distinctive, sharp, and iridescent hematite crystals. Truly a noteworthy specimen from an exceptional individual.
Thursday, Nov 29, 2012
While formal digging at Polis Chrysochous ended in 2007, research is still being conducted on the findings, and Princeton students continue to work at the site. Over fall break, Smith accompanied Adam Maloof, an associate professor of geosciences; Frederik Simons, an assistant professor of geosciences; and students in the freshman seminar "Earth's...
Tuesday, Nov 27, 2012
An enhanced approach to capturing changes on the Earth's surface via satellite could provide a more accurate account of how ice sheets, river basins and other geographic areas are changing as a result of natural and human factors. With their method, Harig and co-author Frederik Simons, an assistant professor of geosciences, can clean up data "...
Tuesday, Nov 27, 2012
An interdisciplinary workshop held at Rutgers University, Thursday-Friday, January 17-18, 2013. This workshop will focus onstatistical approaches to overcoming these challenges and making inferences about the Earth's past environments, bringing together Earth scientists, statisticians, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists to address...
Monday, Nov 26, 2012
Hollywood Science Gone Bad: A Special Screening of "The Core"with Professor Jeroen Tromp. 8 P.M., Friday Nov. 30, East Pyne 010. This is a special movie screening of the exhilarating Hollywood blockbuster The Core, a disaster film in which the Earth’s molten core has stopped rotating, causing the deterioration of the electromagnetic field and...

Pages