News - 2014 - 2014

faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

Related News:

In The News

  


 

More recent articles

Friday, Nov 21, 2014
The third annual meeting of Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership brought together about 200 academic experts and industry leaders in a day-long discussion of the challenges in creating alternative energy sources, the future of energy investment, and the key areas of energy technology.
Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014
Rather than seeking to defend buildings and infrastructure from storm surges, a team of architects and climate scientists is exploring a new vision, with an emphasis on living with rising waters. “Every house will be a waterfront house,” said Princeton Associate Professor of Architecture Paul Lewis. “We’re trying to find a way that canals can work...
Thursday, Nov 13, 2014
Under a National Science Foundation (NSF) Dimensions of Biodiversity initiative, two new projects, which will last 4 to 5 years, will take the Onstott group to Siberia to drill into the world’s oldest permafrost deposits and will return the team to the deep mines of South Africa. Details of what their research will accomplish are listed.
Thursday, Nov 13, 2014
Curious about a career in the sciences? Come by the PUGS Geosciences Alumni Panel and find out for yourself. A GEO Alumni Panel will be on-hand for Q+A discussions. Fri, Nov 14, 3-5pm, in the Great Hall.
Thursday, Nov 13, 2014
Scientists have struggled to understand why there are hot spots in Volcanoes. New research chalks the mystery up to “dark magma”: deep underground pockets of red-hot molten rock that siphon energy from Earth’s core. “It’s a very provocative paper ... a bit speculative,” says Thomas Duffy, a geoscientist at Princeton University who was not involved...

Pages