News - 2014 - 2014

Faculty Spotlight

Professor Blair Schoene

Associate Professor of Geosciences

Area(s): Crustal Evolution, Earth History, and Geochronologyand Thermochronology

Teaching

GEO372 - Rocks
GEO373 - Structural Geology
GEO464 - Quantifying Geologic Time
GEO 556 - Construction and Evolution of Continents

Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) laboratory

The Princeton radiogenic isotope geoscience lab was completed in 2011.  The laboratory mainstains a IsotopX PhoeniX62 Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) to perform high-precision U-Pb geochronology on zircons and other accessory minerals with sub-picogram Pb blanks. MORE ABOUT THE LAB

 

Blair Schoene, Associate Professor of Geosciences

Research Summary

I am a geologist who uses a variety of tools to understand Earth history with a focus on how magmatic processes build continental crust and and affect the biosphere, atmosphere, and oceans.   I run a high-precision U-Pb geochronology lab, and understanding timescales features prominently in much of my group’s research.  Most  projects begin in the field with outrcrop to regional scale mapping, using complementary approaches such as thermochronology, radiogenic isotope tracing, structural analysis, geochemistry, and numerical and statistical techniques.  My lab is in Geosciences at Princeton, and consists of low-blank clean room facilities, two thermal ionization mass spectrometers, rock and mineral separation and characterization facilities. My group also shares space and instrumentation with other lab groups in the department that measure stable and radiogenic isotopes and geochemistry of a whole variety of Earth materials.

 


In the News


 

More recent articles

Friday, Nov 21, 2014
The third annual meeting of Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership brought together about 200 academic experts and industry leaders in a day-long discussion of the challenges in creating alternative energy sources, the future of energy investment, and the key areas of energy technology.
Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014
Rather than seeking to defend buildings and infrastructure from storm surges, a team of architects and climate scientists is exploring a new vision, with an emphasis on living with rising waters. “Every house will be a waterfront house,” said Princeton Associate Professor of Architecture Paul Lewis. “We’re trying to find a way that canals can work...
Thursday, Nov 13, 2014
Under a National Science Foundation (NSF) Dimensions of Biodiversity initiative, two new projects, which will last 4 to 5 years, will take the Onstott group to Siberia to drill into the world’s oldest permafrost deposits and will return the team to the deep mines of South Africa. Details of what their research will accomplish are listed.
Thursday, Nov 13, 2014
Curious about a career in the sciences? Come by the PUGS Geosciences Alumni Panel and find out for yourself. A GEO Alumni Panel will be on-hand for Q+A discussions. Fri, Nov 14, 3-5pm, in the Great Hall.
Thursday, Nov 13, 2014
Scientists have struggled to understand why there are hot spots in Volcanoes. New research chalks the mystery up to “dark magma”: deep underground pockets of red-hot molten rock that siphon energy from Earth’s core. “It’s a very provocative paper ... a bit speculative,” says Thomas Duffy, a geoscientist at Princeton University who was not involved...

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