In The News - 2015 - 2015

Faculty Spotlight

Professor John A. Higgins

Title: Associate Professor of Geosciences
Research Areas:

Professor John Higgins' primary research interest is the evolution of the carbon cycle and the global climate system over Earth history.  One focus has been on processes that control the chemical composition of seawater, and how those processes have changed on geologic timescales.  Another is how on the chemistry of carbonate sediments is affected by processes that occur post-deposition.  These include early diagenetic recrystallization, dolomitization and hydrothermal alteration.  The tools Prof. Higgins has employed to study these include numerical models of chemical and isotopic biogeochemical cycles, as well as analysis of traditional stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon, and new isotope systems such as magnesium, calcium, and potassium.

John A. Higgns, Associate Professor of Geosciences

 


In The News

  


 

More recent articles

Monday, Nov 9, 2015
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Jahnavi N. Punekar on successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis.
Monday, Nov 9, 2015
Last week, NASA scientists published a study in the "Journal of Glaciology" claiming that the continent of Antarctica is gaining ice, rather than losing it, to the tune of 82 gigatons per year from 2003 to 2008. Geoscientist Christopher Harig of Princeton University defends GRACE measurements and the finding that Antarctica is losing mass, and...
Thursday, Nov 5, 2015
A collection of studies examined extreme weather events last year, to look for signs that climate change was a cause or contributor. The papers are part of a broader effort to recognize the effects of climate change as the world warms.
Tuesday, Nov 3, 2015
The interplay of all the different kinds of warming going on in the Pacific at the moment can be difficult to sort out. Geosciences Lect. Gabriel Vecchi likened the challenge to the board game Clue: “There’s all these suspects, and we have them all in the room right now,” he said. “The key is to go and systematically figure out who was where and...
Wednesday, Oct 14, 2015
In 2011, an influx of remote sensing data from satellites scanning the African savannas revealed a mystery: these rolling grasslands, with their heavy rainfalls and spells of drought, were home to significantly fewer trees than researchers had previously expected given the biome’s high annual precipitation. In fact, the 2011 study found that the...

Pages