News - 2016 - 2016

faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

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Friday, Nov 18, 2016
Princeton senior épée Anna Van Brummen '17 made U.S. Fencing history this past weekend with a gold medal at the Suzhou World Cup in China. This will make Van Brummen a contender for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. Join us in congratulating Van Brummen on becoming the first U.S. women's épée fencer to win World Cup gold since women's epee was...
Wednesday, Nov 2, 2016
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Tuesday, Nov 1, 2016
One of the World's greatest explorer Dr. Fred Roots *49 was sent to Antarctica in 1949 to answer a question that was puzzling scientists of the time: Was something bad happening to the world’s glaciers?
Wednesday, Oct 12, 2016
Two pieces of Bisbee-born azurite met again, by chance, thanks to the eagle eye of a student worker. Here's the backstory: In the late 19th century, copper mining took hold in Bisbee, Arizona, under the direction of the Phelps Dodge Corp., initially founded in 1834 as an import-export business. At that time, Princeton University graduates ran some...
Thursday, Oct 6, 2016
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