News - 2017 - 2017

faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

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More recent articles

Wednesday, Sep 27, 2017
Why it’s so hard to compare contemporary tropical cyclones to those from the 19th century. The month was so powerful that it has assured certain records for the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season as a whole, which is already among the 10 strongest seasons ever measured. (Prof. Gabe Vecchi quoted)
Wednesday, Sep 27, 2017
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Dr. Xiangtao Xu on successfully defending his Ph.D. thesis: "Understanding Plant Water Stress and The Terrestrial Carbon Cycle in Tropical Ecosystems: The Roles of Plant Hydraulics, Phenology and Competition" on Tuesday, September 26, 2017.
Wednesday, Sep 20, 2017
That inward contraction of a hurricane’s eye can be one telltale indicator of what hurricane gurus technically call “rapid intensification,” although a more evocative word might simply be “explosion.” “One of the key issues is that it remains quite difficult to predict on a day-to-day basis. And of course, it’s something we would very much like to...
Tuesday, Sep 12, 2017
With the torrential rains of Hurricane Harvey, the historic winds of Irma, and Jose still meandering slowly through the Caribbean, the last few weeks have been full of powerful and frequent hurricanes. In the real world, the planet has gotten warmer, the oceans have gotten warmer, and here we have these intense storms — it all seems to add up. (...
Friday, Sep 8, 2017
Hurricanes Irma and Harvey have reignited discussions about the link between global warming and extreme weather, with climate scientists now saying they can show the connections between the two phenomena better than ever before. “A warmer ocean makes a warmer atmosphere, a warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture,” says Gabriel Vecchi, a professor...

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