Graduate Student Symposium showcases the holistic nature of Geosciences

Monday, Nov 21, 2011

 

Madhavi Parikh (Rutgers University) presents her poster about microbial processes to Geosciences Chair, Bess Ward, and Graduate Symposium co-organizer, Jessica Hawthorne.

Madhavi Parikh (Rutgers University) presents her poster about microbial processes to Geosciences Chair, Bess Ward, and Graduate Symposium co-organizer, Jessica Hawthorne.

The Lewis Library, Princeton UniversityOn Friday, November 11, the graduate students in the Department of Geosciences hosted a collaborative Graduate Research Symposium at Lewis Library. Sponsored by the Department of Geosciences and the Princeton University Graduate School, but organized exclusively by the graduate students, the symposium was intended to showcase the holistic nature of the geosciences by encouraging contributions in atmospheric science, oceanography, paleoclimatology, Earth history, climate dynamics, geology, geochemistry, and geophysics. The Princeton graduate students invited their counterparts from Rutgers University, New York University, Columbia University, and the University of Pennsylvania to present their work alongside the Princeton students. In total, fifty students shared their research with over 110 attendees, consisting of graduate students, faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and undergraduates. In addition to the research aims of the symposium, the event served to increase the visibility of graduate students and their research within the local scientific community, and to provide a venue for social interaction among the graduate students in the area.

 Princeton Geosciences graduate students Yanhua Yuan and Nick Peng, Rutgers graduate student Jeffrey R. Kirkland, and Columbia  graduate student John Templeton.

Students stand in front of their posters during one of the poster sessions. Clockwise, from upper left: Princeton Geosciences graduate students Yanhua Yuan and Nick Peng, Rutgers graduate student Jeffrey R. Kirkland, and Columbia  graduate student John Templeton.

The symposium was divided into four oral and two poster sessions, which included contributions describing a breadth of research topics in the geosciences: modern environmental geochemistry, a variety of geology fields (geomorphology, geophysics, geochemistry, and geochronology), biology and geochemistry of Earth’s past, and Earth systems modeling of past, present, and future climate states. “We hope this was only the first step towards creating a more interactive local geosciences community,” said Andrew Babbin, co-organizer of the event. “In fact, students from Columbia and Rutgers were quite enthusiastic about hosting a similar conference next year.” Further details about the event may be found at the Symposium’s website, http://www.princeton.edu/geosciences/graduate/gradsymposium.

(Left) Symposium co-organizers Andrew Babbin and Jenna Losh. (Right) Jenna Losh and Princeton graduate student Catherine Rose stand with symposium co-organizers Sarah Fawcett and Audrey Yau.(Left) Symposium co-organizers Andrew Babbin and Jenna Losh. (Right) Jenna Losh and Princeton graduate student Catherine Rose stand with symposium co-organizers Sarah Fawcett and Audrey Yau.