News - 2015 - 2015

faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

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More recent articles

Thursday, Sep 3, 2015
Now in the Policy Debate: Literally putting a price on carbon pollution and other greenhouse gasses is the best approach for nurturing the rapid growth of renewable energy and reducing emissions, according to a new policy article published in Nature. The authors – which include the Wilson School's Michael Oppenheimer – urge policymakers to...
Thursday, Sep 3, 2015
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Anne M. Gothmann on successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis.
Monday, Aug 24, 2015
Dangerous storms are one reason the Southern Ocean is so under-researched, although it absorbs almost half of the world’s man-made carbon emissions. Last week, more than 50 researchers (Ethan Campbell '16 and Preston Kemeny '15) returned from a scientific voyage of Antarctica, the first leg of a two-year experiment – the 3rd Southern Ocean...
Tuesday, Aug 18, 2015
A concern among scientists is that higher Arctic temperatures brought about by climate change could result in the release of massive amounts of carbon locked in the region’s frozen soil in the form of carbon dioxide and methane. New research led by researchers at the Department of Geosciences and published in The ISME Journal suggests that, thanks...
Tuesday, Aug 18, 2015
We've (Ethan Campbell '16 and Preston Kemeny '15) have been incredibly busy on our research cruise to Antarctica! Within this week, we’ve had to get over the sea sickness very quickly as we have been working virtually non-stop. Sandi Smart *14 is a new addition to our team and her project involves collecting foraminifera (“forams”, organisms used...

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