News - 2020 - 2020

faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

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More recent articles

Friday, Aug 28, 2020

The season’s most intense hurricane hit the swampy coast between Houston and New Orleans and raced north.

Friday, Aug 28, 2020

An ingenious combination of satellite imaging, machine learning and stress analysis has revealed the Antarctic ice shelves that are most at risk of disintegrating as a result of atmospheric warming. (Lai mentioned)

Friday, Aug 28, 2020

Hurricanes that go from dangerous to deadly very quickly are occurring more often, research suggests.

Wednesday, Aug 26, 2020

When a meteorite hurtles through the atmosphere and crashes to Earth, how does its violent impact alter the minerals found at the landing site? What can the short-lived chemical phases created by these extreme impacts teach scientists about the minerals existing at the high-temperature and pressure conditions found deep inside the planet?

Wednesday, Aug 19, 2020
by The Office of Communication

In collaboration with researchers at UC Berkeley, UC Davis, the University of Buffalo, MIT and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Center for Matter at Atomic Pressures (CMAP), with total funding of $12.96 million over five years spread over the participating institutions, will use high-...

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