News - 2019 - 2019

faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences
Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

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More recent articles

Friday, May 10, 2019
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Dr. Wenjie Lei on successfully defending his Ph.D. thesis: "Global Seismic Full-Waveform Inversion" on Wednesday, May 8, 2019.
Thursday, May 9, 2019
by Sasha (Van Dusen) Turchyn ’97
Science Beyond Guyot: 25 Years of Hess Fellows - A symposium during reunions celebrating the Hess Fellows on Friday, May 31st. Starting at noon.
Monday, May 6, 2019
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Dr. Jessica Lueders-Dumont on successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis: "Nitrogen Isotopes of Otolith-Bound Organic Matter: A New Tool for Trophic Reconstruction Using Modern and Fossil Otoliths" on Friday, May 3, 2019.
Thursday, Apr 25, 2019
When the landmass that is now the Indian subcontinent slammed into Asia about 50 million years ago, the collision changed the configuration of the continents, the landscape, global climate and more. Now a team of Princeton University scientists has identified one more effect: the oxygen in the world’s oceans increased, altering the conditions for...
Tuesday, Apr 23, 2019

GEO graduate students Abigale Wyatt and Allison Hogikyan have each received a fellowship award in the 2019 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

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