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faculty spotlight

Ching-Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS)

Research Summary:  Lai studies fundamental questions in fluid dynamics, climate science, and geophysics by integrating physical and machine-learned models with both experimental and observational data. Her research addresses challenges facing the world, such as advancing our scientific knowledge of ice dynamics under climate change.  Lai uses mathematical models, experiments, simulations, and machine learning tools to study the complex interactions between fluids and elasticity and their interfacial dynamics, such as multiphase flows, flows in deformable structures, and cracks. In particular, her recent work combines deep-learning and physics-based models to predict the disintegration of ice shelves in a warming climate.

Group: Lai Research Group

 

Yao Lai, Assistant Professor of Geosciences


Assistant Professor Ching-Yao Lai

Biography: Ching-Yao Lai is an Assistant Professor jointly appointed in Geoscience (GEO) and Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS). She is also an Associated Faculty of the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) and Affiliated Faculty of the Program in Statistics and Machine Learning (SML) at Princeton University. Yao did her undergraduate study (2013) in Physics at National Taiwan University, Ph.D. (2018) in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at Princeton University, and postdoctoral research in earth science at Lamont Earth Observatory at Columbia University. She grew up in Taiwan.

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The Department of Geosciences has named Srijan Bharati Das as the recipient of the 2022 Elisabeth H. and F. A. Dahlen Fund. The fund was established in 2010 to advance the theoretical…

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New Princeton research shows that prehistoric megatooth sharks, the biggest sharks that ever lived, were apex predators at the highest level ever measured. (Kast, Sigman, Rao, Akhtar mention)

Congratulations to the Class of 2022 and 2021-2022 Ph.D. Recipients
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The Class of 2022

Abigail Baskind
Galen Cadley
Samuel Cryan
Jakob Kintzele
Isabel Koran
Hanna Szabo
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Pictured are (front row) Isabel Koran and Yuri Tamama; (middle row) Samuel Cryan, Prof. Bess Ward, and Hanna Szabo; and (back row) Galen Cadley and Abigail Baskind. Photo…

Commencement events for Class of 2022 and on-campus Commencement details for Class of 2020
May 12, 2022
Author
Written by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton University is celebrating the accomplishments of undergraduate and graduate degree candidates during 2022 year-end events Sunday through Tuesday, May 22-24. The University also will host an on-campus Commencement ceremony for the Class of 2020 on Wednesday, May 18.
No dudes: el cambio climático influye en todas las olas de calor (y en otros eventos extremos)
May 12, 2022
Author
Written by Eduardo Robaina, Climática
(In Spanish) Dos científicos del clima del World Weather Attribution (WWA) han creado una guía sobre cómo comunicar el cambio climático y su relación con los fenómenos meteorológicos extremos. (Vecchi mention)
Frederik J Simons awarded the inaugural (IUGG-CMG) Vladimir Keilis-Borok Medal for 2022
May 12, 2022
The International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) has awarded the inaugural (2022) IUGG Commission on Mathematical Geophysics (IUGG-CMG) Vladimir Keilis-Borok Medal to Frederik J Simons.
Congratulations to Dr. Alex L. Burky for successfully defending his Ph.D. Thesis
May 9, 2022
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Dr. Alex L. Burky on successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis: “Mapping the Mantle Transition Zone Beneath Eastern North America An Automated Receiver Function Approach" on Wednesday, Tuesday, May 3, 2022.
Unchecked global emissions on track to initiate mass extinction of marine life
April 29, 2022
Author
Written by Liana Wait
As greenhouse gas emissions continue to warm the world’s oceans, marine biodiversity could be on track to plummet within the next few centuries to levels not seen since the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to a recent study in the journal Science by Princeton University researchers. (Deutsch, Penn mention)
Deep Learning Poised to ‘Blow Up’ Famed Fluid Equations
April 12, 2022
Author
Written by Jordana Cepelewicz, Quantamagazine
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More recent articles

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Author
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